Re-created Identities: Ancient Myths and American Mythology in Jeffrey Eugenides's 'Middlesex'

Gimenez, Doriane (2016) Re-created Identities: Ancient Myths and American Mythology in Jeffrey Eugenides's 'Middlesex'. [Mémoire]

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Item Type: Mémoire
Creators: Gimenez, Doriane
Directeur de recherche: Guillain, Aurélie
Divisions: UFR Langues, Littératures et Civilisations Etrangères > Département Etudes du Monde Anglophone (DEMA)
Diplôme: M2 Etudes anglophones
Subjects: ARTS-LETTRES-LANGUES-PHILOSOPHIE > Langues > Anglais
Uncontrolled Keywords: Eugenides, Middlesex, Myth, Mythology, Greek, America, Horatio Alger, Immigration, Monster, Saga.
Mots-clés dans une autre langue: Eugenides, Middlesex, Mythe, Mythologie, Grec, Amérique, Horatio Alger, Immigration, Monstre, Saga.
Abstract: The novel Middlesex was written in 2002 by the American author Jeffrey Eugenides and won the Pulitzer Prize the following year, as a reward for the extremely “overplotted” yet captivating narrative(s) that compose(s) it. Through the understanding of the mythical influences and mythological implications altogether interwoven in Middlesex, the story of the Stephanides family becomes a symbol for all types of hybrid identities in American society.
URI: http://dante.univ-tlse2.fr/id/eprint/1614